gwathir:

Cough relief with honey and thyme
To alleviate a cough associated with a cold or flu, take a thyme syrup.

1c (250ml) boiling water2Tbsp dried thyme1/2c (125ml) honey

Pour the boiling water over the thyme, cover, and steep for about 20 minutes. Strain, and add honey. If necessary, warm the tea over a gentle heat to completely dissolve the honey. Store in a dark glass bottle. Take one teaspoon as often as you need. [x]

gwathir:

Cough relief with honey and thyme

To alleviate a cough associated with a cold or flu, take a thyme syrup.

1c (250ml) boiling water
2Tbsp dried thyme
1/2c (125ml) honey

Pour the boiling water over the thyme, cover, and steep for about 20 minutes. Strain, and add honey. If necessary, warm the tea over a gentle heat to completely dissolve the honey. Store in a dark glass bottle. Take one teaspoon as often as you need. [x]

9 hours ago · 551 notes · Source · Reblogged from heathenbookofshades

Crystals For Dreaming

belladonnaswitchblog:

  1. Amethyst for Dream Recall: A crown chakra crystal (7th chakra) that brings a connection to higher divinity. This stone is useful for dream recall. It will also promote peaceful sleep and serenity. It deepens meditations and will aid in deepening dreams as well. It will also aid in insomnia.
  2. Ametrine for Dream Wisdom: A crown chakra crystal (7th Chakra). Ametrine is a man-made blend of Amethyst and Citrine inclusions. Ametrine will aid you in accessing your higher wisdom in the dream realms.
  3. Azurite for Accessing Intuition through Dreams: A third eye chakra crystal (6th Chakra). Azurite heightens psychic awareness and intuition. It will aid you in opening up to the intuitive potentials of your dreams. This is an excellent stone for use with dream work, and is recommended as one of the top stones to choose if you don’t already have one picked out.
  4. Clear Quartz for Amplifying Dreams: All seven chakras. Clear quartz is an amplifier. It is especially beneficial for use in dream work to amplify the vividity of your dreams and the recollection of your dreams upon awakening. Clear quartz is easily programmed for any purpose, and can be programmed to work as a dream stone.
  5. Lepidolite for Nightmares and Insomnia: Crown Chakra (7th Chakra). Lepidolite is a calming crystal. It contains the natural substance lithium, which has been used by modern science to calm agitated individuals. You can access the calming effects of lithium without resorting to prescription drugs simply by keeping lepidolite in your home or on your body. Lepidolite is useful for people with bad dreams, interrupted sleep patterns, anxiety, or insomnia. Often times these three factors will keep a person from having good dream recall. If you frequently experience any of these three factors, consider Lepidolite for your dream work.
  6. Moldavite for Transformative Dream Work: All seven chakras. Moldavite is a powerful stone of transformation. If you are wanting to do some serious dreamwork, use moldavite in conjunction with any of the stones listed above. Moldavite can change your life. By working with it in your dreamwork, it will help you to facilitate faster growth in any area you are focused on, whether it be dream recall, lucid dreaming, or astral travel.

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~How to use these stones~

  1. Put them in a sachet above your bed (I have posted sachet spells already. You can put some of these stones in it even if it’s not on the materials list)
  2. Lay them on a table next to your bed or under your pillow.
  3. Meditate while holding the stone, or meditate with one once a day until you get what you seek.

*Taken and edited from Facebook page: Wild Witch

16 hours ago · 132 notes · Reblogged from belladonnaswitchblog

1 day ago · 380 notes · Reblogged from hellenismosandme

1 day ago · 9 notes · Reblogged from hellenismosandme

1 day ago · 50 notes · Reblogged from soulbiteshellenics

raphaelswings:

MYTHOLOGY  GREEK

HADES (/ˈheɪdiːz/; from Ancient Greek Ἅιδης/ᾍδης, Hāidēs; Doric Ἀΐδας Aidas) was the King of the Underworld, the god of death and the dead. He presided over funeral rites and defended the right of the dead to due burial. Hades was also the god of the hidden wealth of the earth, from the fertile soil with nourished the seed-grain, to the mined wealth of gold, silver and other metals. Hades was devoured by Cronus as soon as he was born, along with four of his siblings. Zeus later caused the Titan to disgorge them, and together they drove the Titan gods from heaven and locked them away in the pit of Tartarus. When the three victorious brothers then drew lots for the division of the cosmos, Hades received the third portion, the dark dismal realm of the underworld, as his domain.

1 week ago · 480 notes · Reblogged from raphaelswings

therealshingetter1 asked: “Excuse me, I saw your post on Greek lore inaccuracies, and I have a question. In the story explaining how Hades kidnaps Persephone, it's often called "The Rape of Persephone". Did this actually happen within context, or is it a mistranslation or an exaggeration or something else? It's been bugging me for years now and I'd appreciate your opinion on the matter.”

soloontherocks:

Rape in historical context means “kidnap”. Rape might have been involved, of course, possibly, but the name of the myth itself is not a reference to it.

For instance, the Rape of the Lock is a poem about someone stealing a lock of hair without permission from a maiden with beautiful hair.

I will point out that regardless of what might or might have happened beforehand, Haides is probably the best husband in all of Greek mythology. He has only two affairs — which let’s face it is pretty big for a Greek deity — and Persephone rules as his equal, not his inferior wife.

I’ll also point out that Persephone’s myth is a strong metaphor for a woman’s life — through the lens of an ancient Greek understanding of women, of course — and this is HUGELY important to context.

At the beginning she is nothing, a minor flower goddess, her entire identity merely “Demeter’s daughter”, even her name — Kore — just meant “the maiden.” Akin to how in childhood a daughter’s role was to be (quite literally, if you’re familiar with ancient Greek marriage law) owned by her parents. A daughter’s identity is as their parents’ daughter, nothing more. How many teenage girls have complained over the years as not being recognized as individuals with their own tastes and personality?

Then she gets carried off by a man who wishes to marry her…and I’ll point out in many more detailed versions of the myth Haides asks Zeus’ permission first. Which of course is a clear reference to a man meeting with a father to discuss the arranged marriage of the daughter. Mind you, ancient Greek wedding ceremony included a mock kidnapping. That was part of how they understood weddings to work. Also, of course, this was ancient Greece, women did not have much of a say in who they married.

THEN Persephone gets taken to the underworld — her husband’s “house” — and that’s when the most important part happens. Haides does not force her to eat the pomegranate seeds that doom her to spend half the year in the Underworld. She chooses to eat them. And if you think one of the most important goddesses in all of mythology was too stupid to know what that would mean, well, you probably need to rethink your understanding of Deity. But yes, Persephone CHOOSES to eat them.

Why? Because beforehand she was her mother’s daughter, Kore, the girl-child. After, she is Persephone, queen of the underworld and equal partner in her husband’s affairs. In myth she repeatedly overrules his decisions, even, or makes decisions for him. Her power only comes to her when she becomes an adult, through marriage. Mind you, the pomegranate is a classic strong symbol of female power and creation and mystery (not to mention, uh, blood). It’s overall a blatant representation of the tranformation from girlhood to womanhood. Yes, this was ancient Greece, so they assumed a woman would always wind up married. But in ancient Greece, a girl was without power. A married woman, however, basically ran the entire household and estate. The husband had shit to do, the wife was the one who commanded the servants and made business decisions for the household while the husband was out soldiering or whatever. A married woman was basically the most powerful thing a girl could possibly hope to be in ancient Greece.

Even without that ancient Greek view, it’s still a powerful metaphor for even modern womanhood. Because she CHOOSES to eat the pomegranates. She CHOOSES to become an adult.

Whatever happened with Haides before that, it’s irrelevant. Unimportant. Haides is important and good in her life because he assists in her transition to adulthood — he literally makes it possible — the way a good Greek husband does, and then proceeds to be an excellent husband, by mythology standards. She would never have become a woman under her mother’s roof.

Also, of course, there’s the whole “the myths are not meant to be taken literally in this religion and if you do the ancients will laugh at you as if you were a grownup who believed in Santa Claus” thing at play, so even if the story did include rape, it’s not literal, it’s a metaphor.

Mention because I’m going to answer this publicly and I don’t know if you follow me: therealshingetter1

If you’re still interested in the subject, elaphos is a Haides devotee.

1 week ago · 675 notes · Reblogged from soloontherocks

facina-oris:

MYTHOLOGY MEME - [3/9] GREEK GODS/GODDESSES: HADES

"To Plouton [Haides].

Plouton, magnanimous,

whose realms profound are fixed beneath

the firm and solid ground,

in the Tartarean plains remote from sight,

and wrapt for ever in the depths of night.”

1 week ago · 785 notes · Reblogged from facina-oris

roseraiess:

Hades, God King of the Underworld, God of the dead and of riches



Then I ascended my throne. At my feet, the newly dead stopped telling ghost stories. They were naked and frightened. They kissed the hem of my robe and prayed, but only those who said, “For Persephone’s sake, my lord” got even an ounce of mercy. (x)

roseraiess:

Hades, God King of the Underworld, God of the dead and of riches

Then I ascended my throne. At my feet, the newly dead stopped telling ghost stories. They were naked and frightened. They kissed the hem of my robe and prayed, but only those who said, “For Persephone’s sake, my lord” got even an ounce of mercy. (x)

1 week ago · 2,009 notes · Reblogged from roseraiess

greek mythology fancast
joaquin phoenix as hades, god of the underworld

1 week ago · 2,337 notes · Reblogged from greijoy