8 hours ago · 960 notes · Source · Reblogged from seagreenwitch

halloweencrafts:

Nightmares Bottle from the Etsy Store of wanderingmaid for $15. Having sold my own crafts, $15 is really cheap considering the amount of time this took and glitter used. Wanderingmaid’s description of the Nightmares Bottle:

This vintage look bottle is filled with mystical black “dust” that only the dark night can bring as well as tiny antiqued papers with classic nightmare themes on them that you may want to keep bottled up! Outside bottle has shimmery black tulle wrapped around the neck. Bottle cork has a crescent moon seal on the top in midnight black and comes sealed in black candle wax but can easily be opened to add your own nightmares when they creep up in the night.

halloweencrafts:

Nightmares Bottle from the Etsy Store of wanderingmaid for $15. Having sold my own crafts, $15 is really cheap considering the amount of time this took and glitter used. Wanderingmaid’s description of the Nightmares Bottle:

This vintage look bottle is filled with mystical black “dust” that only the dark night can bring as well as tiny antiqued papers with classic nightmare themes on them that you may want to keep bottled up! Outside bottle has shimmery black tulle wrapped around the neck. Bottle cork has a crescent moon seal on the top in midnight black and comes sealed in black candle wax but can easily be opened to add your own nightmares when they creep up in the night.

9 hours ago · 550 notes · Reblogged from halloweencrafts

Remember: Magic spells take many forms, from spoken word to candle burning, to mixing oils, to something as simple as posting an image on the wall. Your energy, focus and intent are what transform simple actions, words and gestures into magic spells.
—  Judika Illes, Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells (via dryadwitch)

1 day ago · 2,478 notes · Source · Reblogged from fairytalewitch

How to Witchcraft: Knot, Thread & Cord Magic

belladonnaswitchblog:

foresthoney:

It’s a funny thing. I use knot/cord magic A LOT but I don’t think I’ve ever seen a book devoted to it (I like Scott Cunningham’s chapter on it in Earth Power, pg.91). It’s so versatile though that there SHOULD be more about it.

As a newer witch, knot/cord magic is something I HIGHLY recommend. Especially if you are in the broom closet/can’t light candles or have a fire to burn herbs. It’s easy to do and it’s inconspicuous. There are so many ways to incorporate it too. 

First let’s talk about the different kinds of knot/cord magic:

Braiding: Used for long term, braid three or more colored cords while focusing on your intention and use when necessary. 

Knot 1:  Tie 9 knots on a colored cord while focusing on your intention and place some place where it will not be disturbed (by storing it, burning it or burying it- so the knots will never be undone).

Knot 2: Tie 9 knots on a colored cord while focusing on your intention to store energy. Release knots one by one in the order they were tied to release the energy when needed, once a day consecutively.

Crochet/Knitting: Use to imbue intention into the item so that the wearer benefits (e.g. warmth, self confidence, protection, etc).

Cross Stitch/Embroidery: Used to imbue intention into the item. Especially useful with sigils. 

How to do it:

There are a few methods known when working with knot & cord magic.

Braided cords typically do not get undone, and are stored for long term use. While braiding the cord (typically in 9’ or 9” measurements but if you don’t follow the threefold law this is irrelevant— unless your deity is a triplicate that you plan to invoke). To Do: Concentrate on your intent while braiding the cord, visualizing/thinking about it coming to fruition. Once you’re finished braiding consecrate the cord and put it away until you need it. This isn’t meant for an every day thing, just an as needed cord.

Knots can be harnessed in a few ways but the gist is that you’re using the knots to store power related to the intention of your spell. 1) Where you don’t ever untie them, 2) When you untie them as power is needed, or 3) when you untie one knot each day for consecutive days.

Typically you would tie a bead onto one end of the cord so that you know what your starting end is. You can also melt the ends with fire to prevent fraying. To Do: Pass the cord through a candle flame or incense to cleanse it while saying the words of your spell (i.e. the REASON you’re doing this) then you begin tying the knots in the cord you want to say the following while focusing on the intention/the type of power you are storing:

By knot of ONE, the spell’s begun
By knot of TWO, it cometh true
By knot of THREE, so mote it be
By knot of FOUR, this power I store
By knot of FIVE, the spell’s alive
By knot of SIX, this spell I fix
By knot of SEVEN, events I’ll leaven
By knot of EIGHT, it will be Fate
By knot of NINE, what’s done is mine

Generally knots are tied in this order: 

1———6———4———7———3———8———5———9———2

But I have seen other variations, I just find this one easier to follow because it doesn’t start in the middle so you have a reference point for which end contains the 1st knot (the bead). You can also tie things INTO the knot to strengthen the magic even further (hair, wood, stones/gems, etc) just make sure to destroy or bury those items if you choose to untie the knots. Some people use knotted cords as a powerful talisman and don’t untie the knots, if this is the case you want to store it where it won’t be disturbed, burn it so it will never physically be untied or bury it where it will disintegrate in the earth and also never physically be untied. I have done all three methods of handling and I can’t say I prefer one over the other. The really great thing about storing energy is that it’s raised when it will be the most powerful (increases, like success or protection, would be sometime from the new moon to full and decreases, like a binding, would be sometime from the full moon to new) but the power is now stored for use whenever you need it

Crocheting/Knitting is something I consider part of knot and cord magic because you can purposefully stitch your intention into the item you’re making. A lot of time, if for friends/family, I weave warmth and protection into things I make for them. So I might say something like:

With every stitch that I make,
the wearer of this item will be protected
and warm, but as the need arises
they will be alert until they get to safety.
Never too hot, but not cold either,
This item will keep them comfortable.
By earth, air, flame and sea,
as I say, so shall it be.

And I’ll focus on that while I continue to make the item. Off topic, but notice how I put a clause in there that they will be alert if the need arises until they reach safety. I don’t want them to be so warm and comfortable that they neglect their own safety. 

Cross-stitch/embroidery: You can embroider sigils using color appropriate cloth and thread! You can cross stitch spells into your work (like cross stitching an acorn and imbuing it with luck and protection, which actual acorns can represent). There are so many different things you could do, let your imagination do the work!

Color in knot & cord magic:

White: purity, truth, sincerity, spirituality, the goddess, peace, higher self, virginity(as in the woman’s mind is owned by no man), a substitute for any other color.

Red:
 strength, health, vigor, sexual love, energy, passion, courage, element of fire, career goals, fast action, lust, blood of the moon, vibrancy, driving force, survival

Light Blue: tranquility, understanding, patience, calm, gently moving, wisdom, good fortune, opening blocked communication

Dark Blue: impulsiveness, depression, changeability, protection, spiritual inspiration, reassurance, creativity

Green: finance, fertility, luck, Earth Mother, physical healing, monetary success, abundance, tree and plant magick, growth, Element of Earth, personal goals

Gold: wealth, The God, promote winning, safety and power of the male, happiness, playful humor

Yellow: The Sun, intelligence, accelerated learning, memory, logical imagination, breaking mental blocks, selling yourself

Gold/Yellow: attraction, persuasion, charm, confidence

Brown: hesitation, uncertainty, neutrality, influence friendships, special favors

Pink:
 honor, romantic love, morality, Planetary Good Will, healing of emotions, peace, affection,romance, partnerships of emotional maturity, caring, nurturing

Black: loss, discord, confusion, protection, repelling negativity, binding, shapeshifting

Purple: tension, ambition, business progress, power, influencing people in high places, third eye, psychic ability, spiritual power, self assurance, hidden knowledge

Silver/Grey: cancellation, neutrality, stalemate, telepathy,clairvoyance, intuition, clairaudience, psychometry, dreams, astral energies, Female Power, communication, The Goddess, moon magic

Orange: encouragement, adaptability, stimulation, attraction, business goals, property deals, ambition, career goals, general success, justice, legal matters, selling, action

Copper: passion, money goals, professional growth, fertility in business, career maneuvers

(Color correspondance Source, please note this is one of many sources on this)

~I like this. Just going to add my input though.

  1. Sometimes when I make knots, I carry it with me. I either make it into a keychain and attach it to my purse, tie it around my wrist as a bracelet, or for the prosperity one I made, I put it in the change pocket in my wallet. There are so many things you can do with knots, it’s ridiculous. (I usually use the braids as keychains and bracelets since they’re physically stronger and less suspicious than a thread with a bunch of knots in it).
  2. I have never heard of the knots being tied in a certain order like above. Since I don’t ever undo the knots, the order doesn’t matter to me. I just go down the thread as I tie, then sometimes I tie the 2 ends together on the last knot to make it a knotted circle. It represents the power continuing to flow through the thread.
  3. I personally don’t like burning my knots until I’m done with them. I’ve been taught that burning something releases the spell you’re doing. But depending on what spell, burning can help strengthen it, or undo it. Like if I was doing one to release bad habits, I would write the habits on paper then burn the paper. But I don’t like the idea of burning my knots. That’s why I tie the thread into a circle at the end and then I burn it when I don’t need it anymore. I only bury it if I need its power to work for a certain area. Like protection for my home, or to bring prosperity or happiness into the home, I would bury it near my front porch and leave it there. It all depends on the individual witch.

2 days ago · 1,336 notes · Source · Reblogged from belladonnaswitchblog

thebluechicory:

Thyme is a member of the mint family. It is generally a low growing perennial, winter hardy to zone five. Leaves are generally dark, gray green in color and the labiate flowers are tiny and generally pink. Blooms in early to mid summer. There are many tiny oval shaped leaves on each slender, woody stem.
History and Folklore
The word Thyme comes from the Greek meaning to “fumigate”. This indicates that it was used as a smudging herb. The Greeks thought very highly of Thyme. It was mixed in drinks to enhance intoxicating effects and induce bravery and warriors were massaged with thyme oil to ensure their courage. Women wore thyme in their hair to enhance their attractiveness. The phrase “to smell of thyme” meant that one was stylish, well groomed, poised, and otherwise attractive.
Thyme is a Mediterranean native spread throughout Europe by the Romans. Their soldiers added it to their bathwater to increase bravery, strength and vigor. It enjoyed a long association with bravery. In Medieval England, ladies embroidered sprigs of thyme into their knights’ scarves to increase their bravery. In Scotland, highlanders brewed tea to increase courage and keep away nightmares.
Thyme was used as early as 3000 BCE by Sumerians as an antiseptic. It does indeed have impressive antiseptic qualities.
It was used as an embalming herb in ancient Egypt and was burned in other places as offerings to celebrate Rites of Passing. It was placed in coffins throughout Europe to ensure passage into the next world.
Propagation
Thyme grows well in zones 4-9. It prefers full sun to part shade and loose, fast draining soil, preferably sandy. The roots should never be allowed to stay wet. Thyme is winter hardy, but a light mulch will protect it when the ground freezes. It does not need fertilizers. Thyme does best if it is pruned in the spring or summer after its first year.
With the exception of Common Thyme, which is light germinated, so seeds should be scattered on the surface, the seeds are small and slow to germinate, and many varieties are sterile cultivars, so it is best to propagate by division or cuttings, or buy a plant at your local nursery.
Thyme and lavender grow well together, perhaps mainly because they enjoy the same conditions. You can also grow thyme amongst cabbages to protect them from cabbage worms, flies, beetles and aphids.
Thyme attracts bees and faeries and makes a good groundcover in sunny areas.
Harvesting & Storage
Leaves can be harvested as needed throughout the year. Give the plant a year to get established before doing any heavy harvesting. The best flavor is right before flowering.
Thyme dries very well. It should be dried as any other herb on the stem and the leaves stripped off later.
Magical Attributes
Thyme is feminine in nature and associated with the element of water and the planet Venus. Thyme is also associated with Freya,Aphrodite and Ares.
Thyme can be used in spells to increase strength and courage.
When working hard to achieve a goal that seems unachievable, thyme can be used to keep a positive attitude.
Smudge your home with thyme to dispel melancholy, hopelessness and other mellow but negative vibrations, especially after a family tragedy or during a long sickness.
Place thyme beneath your pillow for a restful sleep and happy dreams and to prevent nightmares.
Faeries love thyme. Its addition to your garden will attract them and it can be used in spells to communicate with faeries.
Thyme is excellent in ritual baths and smudging for early spring festivals when we seek to leave the old behind and begin anew.
Household Use
The tiny flowers will attract bees to your garden. Honey made from these flowers is highly prized.
Sachets of thyme hung in your closet or folded in with your stored clothes will keep moths out, and smells nicer than mothballs.Oil of thyme can be used as a household cleaning agent as it is good germ killer and drives away pests. Just put a few drops in a spray bottle with 4 parts water to 1 part vinegar.
A strong infusion of thyme makes a great hair rinse for dark hair and repels head lice. You can add rosemary as well if you have problems with dandruff.
Medical Use
Thyme has been used as a cough remedy and digestive aid as well as a treatment for internal parasites.
The active constituent, Thymol, has strong antibacterial and antifungal properties and a strong scent that helps loosen phlegm and sooths the respiratory system. It is used in many over the counter cold remedies.
It is also used for athlete’s foot and hemorrhoids.
For internal use, steep two teaspoons of fresh herb or one teaspoon of dried herb in one cup of boiling water. Drink no more than twice a day, in the morning and evening, to relieve lung problems and dispel parasites.
A stronger infusion can be used as a mouthwash to treat sore gums, as a foot soak to get rid of athlete’s foot, a body or hair rinse for lice or dip a rag in it and use it as a compress for skin inflammations.
Thyme can also be added to massage oils and bath oils for the treatment of rheumatism and general aches and pains. These oils can also be used for colds and lung complaints.
Use oil of thyme by dropping into an infuser, or into a pan of boiling water and inhaling the fumes up to four times daily to relieve congestion. Never take essential oils internally.
Culinary Use
Thyme has a long association with cooking and is part of French Bouquet Garni and Herbes de Provence. The most common type of thyme used in cooking is Common Thyme or English Thyme, but there are many varieties that can be used, all bring their own personality to the table.
It adds a marvelous rich flavor to meat dishes and stews. Adds flavor to veggies too and is especially good on potatoes. Actually, you can put thyme on just about anything. Try it on grilled cheese sandwiches or in scrambled eggs. It combines well with parsley, sage and rosemary, as the song says.
Thyme is a tough herb, and should be added early in cooking as the flavor is slowly released by heat.
The flowers are edible as well as the leaves, and make a lovely garnish.
The woody stems can be laid over charcoal when barbequing to flavor the smoke.

thebluechicory:

Thyme is a member of the mint family. It is generally a low growing perennial, winter hardy to zone five. Leaves are generally dark, gray green in color and the labiate flowers are tiny and generally pink. Blooms in early to mid summer. There are many tiny oval shaped leaves on each slender, woody stem.

History and Folklore

The word Thyme comes from the Greek meaning to “fumigate”. This indicates that it was used as a smudging herb. The Greeks thought very highly of Thyme. It was mixed in drinks to enhance intoxicating effects and induce bravery and warriors were massaged with thyme oil to ensure their courage. Women wore thyme in their hair to enhance their attractiveness. The phrase “to smell of thyme” meant that one was stylish, well groomed, poised, and otherwise attractive.

Thyme is a Mediterranean native spread throughout Europe by the Romans. Their soldiers added it to their bathwater to increase bravery, strength and vigor. It enjoyed a long association with bravery. In Medieval England, ladies embroidered sprigs of thyme into their knights’ scarves to increase their bravery. In Scotland, highlanders brewed tea to increase courage and keep away nightmares.

Thyme was used as early as 3000 BCE by Sumerians as an antiseptic. It does indeed have impressive antiseptic qualities.

It was used as an embalming herb in ancient Egypt and was burned in other places as offerings to celebrate Rites of Passing. It was placed in coffins throughout Europe to ensure passage into the next world.

Propagation

Thyme grows well in zones 4-9. It prefers full sun to part shade and loose, fast draining soil, preferably sandy. The roots should never be allowed to stay wet. Thyme is winter hardy, but a light mulch will protect it when the ground freezes. It does not need fertilizers. Thyme does best if it is pruned in the spring or summer after its first year.

With the exception of Common Thyme, which is light germinated, so seeds should be scattered on the surface, the seeds are small and slow to germinate, and many varieties are sterile cultivars, so it is best to propagate by division or cuttings, or buy a plant at your local nursery.

Thyme and lavender grow well together, perhaps mainly because they enjoy the same conditions. You can also grow thyme amongst cabbages to protect them from cabbage worms, flies, beetles and aphids.

Thyme attracts bees and faeries and makes a good groundcover in sunny areas.

Harvesting & Storage

Leaves can be harvested as needed throughout the year. Give the plant a year to get established before doing any heavy harvesting. The best flavor is right before flowering.

Thyme dries very well. It should be dried as any other herb on the stem and the leaves stripped off later.

Magical Attributes

Thyme is feminine in nature and associated with the element of water and the planet Venus. Thyme is also associated with Freya,Aphrodite and Ares.

Thyme can be used in spells to increase strength and courage.

When working hard to achieve a goal that seems unachievable, thyme can be used to keep a positive attitude.

Smudge your home with thyme to dispel melancholy, hopelessness and other mellow but negative vibrations, especially after a family tragedy or during a long sickness.

Place thyme beneath your pillow for a restful sleep and happy dreams and to prevent nightmares.

Faeries love thyme. Its addition to your garden will attract them and it can be used in spells to communicate with faeries.

Thyme is excellent in ritual baths and smudging for early spring festivals when we seek to leave the old behind and begin anew.

Household Use

The tiny flowers will attract bees to your garden. Honey made from these flowers is highly prized.

Sachets of thyme hung in your closet or folded in with your stored clothes will keep moths out, and smells nicer than mothballs.
Oil of thyme can be used as a household cleaning agent as it is good germ killer and drives away pests. Just put a few drops in a spray bottle with 4 parts water to 1 part vinegar.

A strong infusion of thyme makes a great hair rinse for dark hair and repels head lice. You can add rosemary as well if you have problems with dandruff.

Medical Use

Thyme has been used as a cough remedy and digestive aid as well as a treatment for internal parasites.

The active constituent, Thymol, has strong antibacterial and antifungal properties and a strong scent that helps loosen phlegm and sooths the respiratory system. It is used in many over the counter cold remedies.

It is also used for athlete’s foot and hemorrhoids.

For internal use, steep two teaspoons of fresh herb or one teaspoon of dried herb in one cup of boiling water. Drink no more than twice a day, in the morning and evening, to relieve lung problems and dispel parasites.

A stronger infusion can be used as a mouthwash to treat sore gums, as a foot soak to get rid of athlete’s foot, a body or hair rinse for lice or dip a rag in it and use it as a compress for skin inflammations.

Thyme can also be added to massage oils and bath oils for the treatment of rheumatism and general aches and pains. These oils can also be used for colds and lung complaints.

Use oil of thyme by dropping into an infuser, or into a pan of boiling water and inhaling the fumes up to four times daily to relieve congestion. Never take essential oils internally.

Culinary Use

Thyme has a long association with cooking and is part of French Bouquet Garni and Herbes de Provence. The most common type of thyme used in cooking is Common Thyme or English Thyme, but there are many varieties that can be used, all bring their own personality to the table.

It adds a marvelous rich flavor to meat dishes and stews. Adds flavor to veggies too and is especially good on potatoes. Actually, you can put thyme on just about anything. Try it on grilled cheese sandwiches or in scrambled eggs. It combines well with parsley, sage and rosemary, as the song says.

Thyme is a tough herb, and should be added early in cooking as the flavor is slowly released by heat.

The flowers are edible as well as the leaves, and make a lovely garnish.

The woody stems can be laid over charcoal when barbequing to flavor the smoke.

4 days ago · 411 notes · Source · Reblogged from belladonnaswitchblog

ladyastoria:

Beautiful Goddess Memes! My favorites are Idunn, Sigyn and Skadi. The most impressive, in my opinion, is Sigyn’s meme. The pictures really shows destiny and character of the goddess.

5 days ago · 1,049 notes · Source · Reblogged from teacup-witch

5 days ago · 1,500 notes · Source · Reblogged from fairytalewitch

WITCHY IDEA

funnylittlewitchgirl:

punchbuggydragon:

witchyroses:

FUCKIN WITCHY PILLOWCASES

draw a sigil on ur pilowcase. Insomnia? sleep sigil. Travel trouble? Fucking travel sigil. Can’t remember dreams? Memory sigil. Need to work out a problem? Solution sigil. Want prophetic dreams? FUCKING SIGILS MAN. In the broom closet? draw on the inside of the pillowcase with pencil. STILL FUCKING EFFECTIVE. use washable marker or pencil and BAM you can wash it out and do a new one. YOU CAN THANK ME LATER.

SOMEONE HAS THE SAME IDEA AS MEEEE

Some serious stitch witchcraft and knot magic could be added to this by embroidering or cross-stitching the sigils instead of drawing them on.

5 days ago · 1,017 notes · Source · Reblogged from funnylittlewitchgirl

echtrai:

To easily remove wax from candle holders, stick the holders in the freezer. When the wax hardens, it will be much easier to pop off. 
Coat a candle holder with cooking spray before you put the candle in to make it easier to get the wax out later. 
To light hard-to-reach candles in jars or the like, light the end of a piece of spaghetti. 
If a candle doesn’t quite fit its holder, try wedging a toothpick in between the candle and the container. Break off the visible portion of the toothpick. 
Freeze candles before use to make them last longer. Be careful about doing this with candles that have a coating, though - as the candle may separate from the covering. 
Keep wicks trimmed to about 1/4 inch. If the wick is too long, it can cause smoke and make the candle burn too fast. 
Make sure you clean any debris that gets in the wax pool. Stray wick trimmings or bits of paper can catch fire. 
And, as always
Don’t leave a burning candle unattended! 

echtrai:

  • To easily remove wax from candle holders, stick the holders in the freezer. When the wax hardens, it will be much easier to pop off. 
  • Coat a candle holder with cooking spray before you put the candle in to make it easier to get the wax out later. 
  • To light hard-to-reach candles in jars or the like, light the end of a piece of spaghetti. 
  • If a candle doesn’t quite fit its holder, try wedging a toothpick in between the candle and the container. Break off the visible portion of the toothpick. 
  • Freeze candles before use to make them last longer. Be careful about doing this with candles that have a coating, though - as the candle may separate from the covering. 
  • Keep wicks trimmed to about 1/4 inch. If the wick is too long, it can cause smoke and make the candle burn too fast. 
  • Make sure you clean any debris that gets in the wax pool. Stray wick trimmings or bits of paper can catch fire. 

And, as always

  • Don’t leave a burning candle unattended! 

6 days ago · 2,477 notes · Source · Reblogged from teacup-witch

Magickal Uses of Dandelion

herbalriot:

Gender: Masculine

Planet: Jupiter

Element: Air

Deity: Hecate

Power: Divination, wishes, calling spirits

Folklore: The dandelion, which probably originated in Asia, spread throughout the world before written history. When Puritans set out from Europe for the New World, they brought the dandelion for their gardens because it was considered an essential plant for food and health.

Dandelion Leaf: Summoning spirits, healing, purification and defeating negativity. Bury in northwest corner of yard to bring favorable winds. Use in sachets and charms to make wishes come true.

Dandelion Root: Magickal uses include divination, wishes and calling spirits. Use in dream pillows & sachets for sleep protection. Bury on northwest side of house to draw good luck. Drink dandelion tea or coffee to promote psychic powers. Leave a cup of this hot infusion by the bed to call spirits.

Read More

1 week ago · 309 notes · Reblogged from herbalriot